Beauty

A simple & cheap guide to cleaning makeup brushes

Makeup Brush

Honestly, how often do you wash your makeup brushes?

Our brushes and sponges come into contact with our skin and beauty products daily, and although you might not be aware of it, there are bacteria growing on them.

You probably know by now that makeup brushes should be an investment. There is no point spending hundreds of dollars on expensive beauty products but not having the proper tools to apply it.

It is equally as important to frequently sanitise and wash your brushes. This will not only prolong the life of your brushes but also help avoid breakouts on your skin.


Washing your makeup brushes does not have to be a time-consuming and expensive task. It can be really simple and inexpensive.

How to clean a Makeup Brush

What you need:

- Dirty makeup brushes

- Access to a sink

- Johnson’s Baby Shampoo 

- Towel

Step 1:

Fill the sink halfway with luke warm water. Dip the bristles of your brushes into the water to remove the first layer of product.

Step 2:

Line your brushes on the edge of the sink. Dispense some Johnson’s Baby Shampoo into the palm of your hand and swirl the bristles of your brush in the shampoo using circular motions.

Step 3:

Rinse the bristles under a running tap until the water comes out clear (if the water is still coloured go ahead and repeat step 2). Keep your brushes facing down and ensure only the bristles are getting wet. This will prevent any liquid from coming into contact the the glue and keep your brushes from shedding.

Step 4:

Gently squeeze the excess water out of the bristles. Roll a towel and place your brushes balancing at a downward facing angle to dry.

How often should I wash my brushes?

Ideally, your brushes should be washed weekly however, as long as you don't have an infection or severe breakout on your face, you can get away with washing your brushes once or twice a month. To keep your tools sanitised in between washes you can use a brush cleansing spray and a tissue to spot clean. 


Words: Frances van Eeden